Pregnancy & Infant Loss

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OCTOBER IS PREGNANCY & INFANT LOSS AWARENESS MONTH

 

If you or someone you care about has lost a child to stillbirth, miscarriage, SIDS, or any other cause at any point during pregnancy or infancy, please join us in raising awareness this October for Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month.

 

Tens of thousands of families across the United States are devastated each year by the death of their baby. But the grief of these families and the value of their babies’ lives are very rarely acknowledged. In 1988, US President Ronald Reagan declared October as a month to recognize the unique grief of bereaved parents in an effort to demonstrate support to the many families who have suffered such a tragic loss. Promoting awareness of pregnancy and infant loss not only increases the likelihood that grieving families will receive understanding and support, but also results in improved education and prevention efforts which may ultimately reduce the incidence of these tragedies. 

 

#NeverBeStill  campaign seeks to break the silence surrounding stillbirth and other pregnancy/infant losses by not only educating the public about ways to support bereaved families but also empowering expectant mothers to have a healthy pregnancy – because every pregnancy deserves a happy ending!   In October, and always, we honor all babies amongst the stars!!!!!!

Here are a few other ways you can help:

 

OCTOBER 15TH – WORLD PREGNANCY & INFANT LOSS REMEMBRANCE DAY

 

On October 15th, participate in the International Wave of Light  by lighting a candle at 7 pm local time to honor all babies gone too soon. Keep your candle lit for at least one hour to create a continuous “Wave of Light” across all time zones covering the entire globe!!!!!!!

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What is SIDS?

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden and unexplained death of a baby younger than 1 year old. A diagnosis of SIDS is made if the baby’s death remains unexplained even after a death scene investigation, an autopsy, and a review of the clinical history.

SIDS is part of a larger category of unexpected (as opposed to unexplained) infant deaths called SUDI (sudden unexpected death in infancy). Babies who die suddenly but whose causes of death are later explained (infection, brain abnormality, cardiac dysfunction, etc.) also fall into this SUDI category.

Who is at risk for SIDS?

SIDS is a mysterious syndrome, since by its very definition the cause cannot be determined. But certain risk factors do exist.

About 2,300 babies in the United States die of SIDS each year. Some babies are more at risk than others. For example, SIDS is more likely to affect a baby who is between 1 and 4 months old, it is more common in boys than girls, and most deaths occur during the fall, winter and early spring months.

Factors that may place a baby at higher risk of dying from SIDS include the following:

  • babies who sleep on their stomach or their side rather than their back

  • overheating while sleeping

  • too soft a sleeping surface, with fluffy blankets or toys

  • mothers who smoke during pregnancy (three times more likely to have a baby with SIDS)

  • exposure to passive smoke from smoking by mothers, fathers, and others in the household doubles a baby's risk of SIDS

  • mothers who are younger than 20 years old at the time of their first pregnancy

  • babies born to mothers who had little, late, or no prenatal care

  • premature  or  low birth weight    babies

  • having a sibling who died of SIDS

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